African American Community Interviews

= Audio Available Online
955
Breckenridge is a black businessman from Louisville who founded his own construction-contracting company in 1971. In this interview he discusses his life, family history, education, career and views of black history in Louisville. Redevelopment of Louisville and early black contractors are also discussed.
987
Mr. Bright is a third generation black Louisville businessman. He discusses his family's history in the drug store and beauty aid businesses, his education and personal history.
1095
Bryant discusses her childhood in Detroit, Michigan, where her father was involved in fair housing work. The interview also includes recollections of her education at a private girls' school in Washington, D.C. and at Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee, where she received an AB in history; her move to Louisville with her husband, a physician; her work with the West End Community Council; and involvement with the Black Six conspiracy trial.
983
Mrs. Butler discusses her recollections of Simmons University beginning around 1909; the General Association of Kentucky Baptists (formerly the General Association of Colored Baptists in Kentucky); and the American Baptist newspaper beginning around the 1930s; I. Willis Cole, editor of the Louisville Leader; and Reverend William H. Ballew of the General Association of Kentucky Baptists.
841
Mrs. Butler is one of Mammoth Life Insurance Company's vice presidents as well as its secretary. She discusses her career and memories of her father, Henry E. Hall, who was one of the founders of the company. She also discusses the Walnut Street black business district and Mammoth Life's building there before the 1965 Urban Renewal program.
946
Mrs. Casey is the daughter of William Jones, the first black licensed electrician in Kentucky. She discusses her family history, her father's work and her own life.
978
In this interview, Mr. Cole discusses his early education in Louisville, working for his father�s newspaper the Louisville Leader and describes what it was like to be the child of a prominent figure in the community. He describes his father physically and tempramentally and reflects on attendance at the Louisville Municipal College and urban renewal.
851
Mr. Coleman is a employee of the Louisville Urban League. This interview concerns his involvement with the Urban League and the Louisville Civil Rights movement.
730
Discussion with Judge Combs, governor of Kentucky, 1959-1963, about Frank L. Stanley, Sr. and the Civil Rights movement in Kentucky; includes legislation passed in Kentucky concerning civil rights during Combs' administration and the part Stanley played as advisor to the governor.
926
Mr. Cordery was Director of Consumer Service with the US Post Office in Louisville. The interview contains three main subjects: his career in the Post Office; his career in the Army Reserve; and his civilian life, including his term as president of the local chapter of the NAACP. He also discusses his involvement in originating a mortgage-lending institution for blacks in Louisville.