African American Community Interviews

= Audio Available Online
1005
Irvin discusses her childhood in Hopkinsville, Kentucky; her primary and secondary education there; her move to Louisville in 1950, a city she found to be "friendly to blacks, but very segregated"; involvement in open housing demonstrations in Louisville's south end, led by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.; and work in Democratic politics as a precinct co -captain, captain, and committee woman.
919
Mrs. Jackson has been very active in the Louisville community especially with the African Methodist Episcopal Zion (AME Zion) Church in Louisville. She discusses her church activities, both local and national; her own lifetime, her family's role in desegregation and her family history.
995
Johnson, who was over 100 years old at the time of the interview, discusses his personal history, including his experiences as a soldier in the Spanish-American War. He also talks about his experience as a black man in America.
497
Mr. Johnson discusses his experiences as a school board member in Jefferson County.
1221
Johnson discusses his role as administrator of Red Cross (Community) Hospital; the problems confronting him and the hospital; and why the hospital failed to survive.
940
The Jones are a black couple in their mid-fifties who were long-time residents of Parkland area. Mr. Jones was a 1935 graduate of Central High School. He discusses his schooling and career at the U.S. Post Office in Louisville. Mrs. Jones discusses her family history, education, and her career as public health nurse in Louisville. Together, they they discussed their remembrances and lives in Parkland. The process of urban renewal and the changes in the area are discussed, along with the impact of the 1937 Flood.
982
The eldest son of the Reverend H. Wise Jones, who was the minister of the Green Street Baptist from 1912 until 1950, discusses the history of the church, the role that religion and the church played in his life and the lives of blacks in Louisville. He also discusses the role that the black Baptist church played in the 1950s and 1960s Civil Rights movement in Louisville and the United States.
949
Mrs. Kenzer is the daughter of William Jones, the first licensed black electrician in Kentucky. She discusses her father's business, family memories and her own life. Talks about the John Little Presbyterian and their civic and social classes in the neighborhood and their impact. Discusses her first husband, Charles L. Eubanks, and his attempt to gain admission to UK’s School of Engineering and segregation’s role in her life. Then in her ensuing marriages, she supplied desserts to many restaurants in the city until urban renewal forced the closure of her business.
977
Mr. Key was a musician. He was born in Louisville but really launched his career in Chicago before touring as a singer. In this interview, he discusses his career, including the stint he did in the U.S. Army in Asia and Europe. He also discusses the music "scene" in Louisville in the middle of the twentieth century, beginning with the nightclubs that were open in the 1920s-1940s, under segregation, and including an assessment of the clubs hosting live music in the 1970s. Mr. Key also assesses the local talent, and discusses the difficulty of making it as a performer in Louisville.
1150
Ms. Kidd discusses her life, including her childhood growing up in Bourbon County. Kidd attended the Lincoln Institute in Simpsonville, Kentucky, and then began working for Mammoth Life Insurance Company, Louisville-based black-owned life insurance company. She discusses her career with Mammoth Life, which was interupted by service in the Red Cross during World War II. She discusses her experiences with the Red Cross, both during her training and during her service overseas. She discusses differences in white attitudes, in particular. She describes her work in pubilc relations and sales after the war, as well as her political career. She was elected to the Kentucky Assembly in 1967 and began serving in 1968. She discusses her attempts to pass legislation to give tax breaks to companies that would provide training to Kentucky residents, and her successful efforts to pass a low-cost housing bill.