African American Community Interviews

= Audio Available Online
1000
The Neighbors discuss their personal experiences and their jobs as chauffeur and maid for Mrs. Robert Worth Bingham.
937
Margaret Ovitie, a long time resident of Parkland, 70-year-old black woman. She was a 1926 graduate of Central High School and discusses her family stories dating back to Jenny, original family member to have come from Africa. She also discusses her years in Parkland and changes in Parkland.
849
This interview took place at the Parkland Branch of the Louisville Free Public Library. Three black residents of the Parkland area of Louisville tell family stories. The residents were Dathon A. Jones, Oma H. Jones and the Reverend Stepney S. Ray.
950
A senior citizen's arts and crafts group at the Parkland Branch Library discuss their lives in the Depression years, the 1937 flood and their remembrances of the early Parkland area.
832
This interview deals with the career of Dr. Parrish at the Louisville Municipal College and the University of Louisville. His education, background and his opinions about the economic history of blacks in Louisville were included. Dr. Parrish was the only black professor employed by the University of Louisville after integration.
842
Dr. Parrish discusses his father, Charles H. Parrish, Sr., who was a Baptist minister and president of Simmons University, a black Baptist college in Louisville. Parrish also discusses his own life and work, including his time teaching at Simmons, at Louisville Municipal College (University of Louisville's college for African Americans under segregation), and finally at the University of Louisville after the Municipal College closed and UofL integrated. Dr. Parrish was the only member of Municipal's faculty who was offered an appointment at UofL following LMC's closure, becoming UofL's first African American faculty member. He describes this experience as well as his ongoing research interests.
842
Dr. Parrish discusses his father, Charles H. Parrish, Sr., who was a Baptist minister and president of Simmons University, a black Baptist college in Louisville. Parrish also discusses his own life and work, including his time teaching at Simmons, at Louisville Municipal College (University of Louisville's college for African Americans under segregation), and finally at the University of Louisville after the Municipal College closed and UofL integrated. Dr. Parrish was the only member of Municipal's faculty who was offered an appointment at UofL following LMC's closure, becoming UofL's first African American faculty member. He describes this experience as well as his ongoing research interests.
842
Dr. Parrish discusses his father, Charles H. Parrish, Sr., who was a Baptist minister and president of Simmons University, a black Baptist college in Louisville. Parrish also discusses his own life and work, including his time teaching at Simmons, at Louisville Municipal College (University of Louisville's college for African Americans under segregation), and finally at the University of Louisville after the Municipal College closed and UofL integrated. Dr. Parrish was the only member of Municipal's faculty who was offered an appointment at UofL following LMC's closure, becoming UofL's first African American faculty member. He describes this experience as well as his ongoing research interests.
860
This interview deals with black experience in world events from 1915 through 1930.
975
Mr. Perry discusses his education, time in the Army during World War I, and his personal experiences as black principal in the Louisville school system. Included is a discussion about the quality of education received by blacks before and after desegregation, how black facilities compared with white facilities, and why few school employees were involved in Civil Rights movement in Louisville.