Louisville's Jewish Community

1479
Jewish Community interviews
1480
Jewish Community interviews
1049
1173
Benovitz discusses her grandparents, Lithuanian immigrants, and her grandfather's work as a peddler; her father's dry goods business and the family's life in Carrollton, Mississippi, where they lived for twenty years before returning to Louisville in 1923; her husband's business in New Albany, which operated from 1941 until 1966; the Depression of the 1930s, World War II, and recent changes in the local Jewish community.
1481
Jewish Community interviews
1133
Berg was reared in Brooklyn, New York, where he attended elementary and secondary school. His parents had come to the US from Russia. Berg's father attended trade school and worked as a plumber in New York. Harold came to Louisville to attend the University of Louisville for his pre-medical and medical education. Berg recieved his MD and completed his internship before being drafted in the US Army during World War II. He served in the Pacific Theater as a surgeon and after the war retuened to the US to complete his residency in surgery. Since 1951 he has practiced in Louisville. Berg is also known for his work in mosaics, examples of which were on display at the Jewish Community Center and the School of Medicine at the University of Louisville at the time of the interview.
252
Tape 1: Berman, a Louisville native, recalls family immigration, reasons for immigration, and European conditions. His parents were Meyer Berman of Covna and Esther Spindler of Grodna, Poland. He discusses associated families such as Goldsmith, Fink, Schuster, Sher Askenaz, Frehling, Mandel, Banshek (St. Louis), Goldberg, Bornstein, Goc, Arthur Kling, Israel and Zehavi Naamani. He describes Louisville merchants in 1912; family life; traditions; the University of Louisville in 1929; Market Street; 4th and Hill Streets; neighborhood stables; Ali Bornstein, builder; Ohio River's importance; Young Men's Hebrew Association; Jewish Hospital; Louis Hebrew School; Jewish Professionals; the Haymarket; Demolay for Boys; Congregations. Tape 2: Discusses Rabbi Zarchy; Rabbi Madlebaum 1940 - as president Kennesseth; World War II; B'nai B'rith; the 1937 flood; shabbat; Four Courts.
1157
Berman discusses how and why his parents came to the United States from Poland; his father's work as a peddler and in other businesses; the early Orthodox Jewish community in Louisville; the effects of the Depression on this father's business; his decision to attend the University of Louisville School of Law, from which he graduated in 1928; his early law practice; and activities in Keneseth Israel congregation. Berman concludes with reflections on changes in the local Jewish community during his memory.
1016
Berman discusses Beth Hamedrash Hagadol, the Louisville Hebrew School, the Young Men's Hebrew Association, Neighborhood House, the Adath Jeshurun Sunday school, synagogue picnics, the Phoenix Hill Neighborhood, Liberty Hall, and World War I.
1024
The narrator discusses Harry Bloom, the Louisville Evening Post, the Louisville Times, apartment buildings at Second and Kentucky Streets, Louise Harris, Morris Simon, Joseph Hourath, the Young Men's Hebrew Association Orchestra, Robert Whitney and the Louisville Orchestra, the Music Study Club, Mrs. Sideny Meyers, Mrs. Lewis Cole, Etta Rauch, Emily Dembitz, Hattie Bishop Speed, Morris Spearlmutter, Rabbi Gittleman, Fanny Brandeis, and Jean Tachau.