Louisville's Jewish Community

= Audio Available Online
1479
Abraham discusses the history of his family in Kentucky, the neighborhoods he grew up in around Louisville and some of the Jewish-owned businesses in town.
1480
Mrs. Abramson talks about growing up in Louisville. She discusses where they lived when she was growing up and those who lived around them, including neighbors as well as her extended family members. Mrs. Abramson talks about the friends that she had growing up, the schools that she went to, and her memories of those times. Mrs. Abramson discusses some of the historical events that she's lived through as well, including Pearl Harbor. She also talks about her father's work at the bank and her memories of the stock market crash that came from her father's work friends. Mrs. Abramson also discusses her memories of the flood, when her and her family were living with her family in the Highlands.
1049
Baer talks about her childhood, her memories of the shul at 529 South Seventh Street, businesses in the Jewish neighborhood where she lived, and memories of Sunday school.
1173
Benovitz discusses her grandparents, Lithuanian immigrants, and her grandfather's work as a peddler; her father's dry goods business and the family's life in Carrollton, Mississippi, where they lived for twenty years before returning to Louisville in 1923; her husband's business in New Albany, which operated from 1941 until 1966; the Depression of the 1930s, World War II, and recent changes in the local Jewish community.
1481
Benovitz shares his memories of the Jewish community in Louisville.
1133
Berg was reared in Brooklyn, New York, where he attended elementary and secondary school. His parents had come to the US from Russia. Berg's father attended trade school and worked as a plumber in New York. Harold came to Louisville to attend the University of Louisville for his pre-medical and medical education. Berg recieved his MD and completed his internship before being drafted in the US Army during World War II. He served in the Pacific Theater as a surgeon and after the war retuened to the US to complete his residency in surgery. Since 1951 he has practiced in Louisville. Berg is also known for his work in mosaics, examples of which were on display at the Jewish Community Center and the School of Medicine at the University of Louisville at the time of the interview.
252
Berman, a Louisville native, recalls family immigration, reasons for immigration, and European conditions. His parents were Meyer Berman of Covna and Esther Spindler of Grodna, Poland. He discusses associated families such as Goldsmith, Fink, Schuster, Sher Askenaz, Frehling, Mandel, Banshek (St. Louis), Goldberg, Bornstein, Goc, Arthur Kling, Israel and Zehavi Naamani. He describes Louisville merchants in 1912; family life; traditions; the University of Louisville in 1929; Market Street; 4th and Hill Streets; neighborhood stables; Ali Bornstein, builder; Ohio River's importance; Young Men's Hebrew Association; Jewish Hospital; Louis Hebrew School; Jewish Professionals; the Haymarket; Demolay for Boys; Congregations. Tape 2: Discusses Rabbi Zarchy; Rabbi Madlebaum 1940 - as president Kennesseth; World War II; B'nai B'rith; the 1937 flood; shabbat; Four Courts.
2628
Berman talks about Jewish young people joining professions, the effect of the Great Depression on small businesses, investing in real estate in the early 20th century, his generation choosing to enter the professions rather than going into business, working as a lawyer defending bootleggeres for a brief period, his opinion about the Masons did not do enough to resist nazism, his reflections on a recent reports of swastikas posted in Louisville and the Constitutional right to free speech. He also reflects on the changes in the Jewish community over time, his involvement in the Junior Order of United American Mechanics.
1157
Berman discusses how and why his parents came to the United States from Poland; his father's work as a peddler and in other businesses; the early Orthodox Jewish community in Louisville; the effects of the Depression on this father's business; his decision to attend the University of Louisville School of Law, from which he graduated in 1928; his early law practice; and activities in Keneseth Israel congregation. Berman concludes with reflections on changes in the local Jewish community during his memory.
1016
Berman discusses Beth Hamedrash Hagadol, the Louisville Hebrew School, the Young Men's Hebrew Association, Neighborhood House, the Adath Jeshurun Sunday school, synagogue picnics, the Phoenix Hill Neighborhood, Liberty Hall, and World War I.
1024
The narrator discusses Harry Bloom, the Louisville Evening Post, the Louisville Times, apartment buildings at Second and Kentucky Streets, Louise Harris, Morris Simon, Joseph Hourath, the Young Men's Hebrew Association Orchestra, Robert Whitney and the Louisville Orchestra, the Music Study Club, Mrs. Sideny Meyers, Mrs. Lewis Cole, Etta Rauch, Emily Dembitz, Hattie Bishop Speed, Morris Spearlmutter, Rabbi Gittleman, Fanny Brandeis, and Jean Tachau.
1482
Betty Bronner, chair of the Jewish Community Center's Family History Project is giving an oral summary of the type of information gathered through the community interviews. She first summarizes some of the reasons why people came to Louisville.
1035
The narrator discusses the origins of Adath Jeshurun congregation as well as the neighborhoods she lived in, including the West End.
1032
Topics discussed include the Young Men's Hebrew Association.
1015
Mrs. Byck discusses Adath Israel congregation, the League of Women Voters, Louisville Collegiate School, the Standard Club, the Pendennis Club, Banbergen-Bloom Company, the Adler Piano Company, and the National Council of Jewish Women.
1045
Cole talks about how is family came to Louisville. He discusses his relationship to I.W. Bernheim. He talks about his wife Jean and their children and moving from an apartment downtown to the Highlands. He also discusses his work with the Conference of Jewish Organizations.
1052
Briefly mentions family's origins in Russia and Hungary, father's birth in Louisville, and mother's birth in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. Recalls childhood residences as well as early jobs at a drug store and as editor of the U of L student newspaper. Lists and describes many neighbors (both Jews and non-Jews) at Ouerbacker Court and Sherman Place Apartment. Discusses tenure as editor of the Louisville Cardinal, the University of Louisville student newspaper. Describes how his "rebellious" and "radical policy" as editor got him in trouble with Charlie Morris, founder and chairman of the Louisville Conference of Jewish Organizations, who accused Conn of "damaging the Jewish community."
248
Rabbi Devine was born in 1919. He lived in a Jewish Philadelphia neighborhood and describes his early life and Dr. Dembitz' (Gratz College) influence. He discusses Yeshiva College in New York City. He was ordained in 1940, and he talks about early pulpits. His first congregation was in Hamilton, Ohio; he was in Chicago 13 years and then came to Brith Sholom, in Louisville. He discusses Brith Sholom and individuals including Zach Oppenheimer, Sam Fishman, Milton Berman, Joe Wolf, and Irv Lipetz. He describes Louisville in 1969: the togetherness of rabbis and community in Louisville, Rabbi Roodman. He describes consolidation and changes since 1940 - schools, Day School, Russian families.
1483
Rabbi Diamond talks about how he decided to become a rabbi, including his decision to start to learn more about his faith after wanting to learn more about why the Jewish faith would be targeted by the Holocaust. He talks about his learning of Hebrew and applying to the college, where he had taken courses that would help to prepare him and deepen his knowledge of the Jewish faith.
1106
The Diamonds discuss their parents who came to the United States from Latvia; Mrs. Diamond's education at the Louisville Normal School, a two-year teacher's college run by the city; Dr. Diamond's education at the University of Kentucky and the University of Louisville School of Medicine; recollections of World War II and its impact on the local Jewish community; anti-Semitism in Louisville; and impressions of the nation of Israel, Zionism, and involvement in the local Zionist movement.
1106
The Diamonds discuss their parents who came to the United States from Latvia; Mrs. Diamond's education at the Louisville Normal School, a two-year teacher's college run by the city; Dr. Diamond's education at the University of Kentucky and the University of Louisville School of Medicine; recollections of World War II and its impact on the local Jewish community; anti-Semitism in Louisville; and impressions of the nation of Israel, Zionism, and involvement in the local Zionist movement.
249
Erlen was born in 1906 in Columbus, Ohio. He came to Louisville as Executive Director of the Jewish Social Services Agency in 1938. He recalls Jewish geographical and congregational divisions; Young Men's Hebrew Association; Secretary of YMHA, War year; then temporary Executive Director 1942-1944. He remembers desegregation of schools, parks, and neighborhoods. He recalls discrimination against Jews; the Civil Liberties Union; Civil Rights; Arthur Kling. He discusses resettlement of victims concentration camps; 1990s Russian resettlement; Polish resettlement in 1964; the family unit; nursing homes; Louisville Hebrew Home 1949; Jewish Family and Vocational Service and Dave Dobson; memories of early Jewish civil workers and volunteers.
1030
The executive secretary of the Jewish Social Service Agency of Louisville discusses his work with that organization and its predecessors since coming to Louisville in 1938. Recollections also include the origins of Erlen's interest in Jewish social work, his education at the Ohio State University and the New York Graduate School of Social Work, work with the Jewish Community Federation of Louisville and its predecessor organizations, the resettlement of Jewish immigrants to Louisville, and recollections of such individuals as E.S. Tachau, Charles Morris, Stuart Handmaker, Marshall Bensinger, and Lewis Cole. Erlen also discusses changes in residential patterns within Louisville's Jewish community and the growth of professionalism within local Jewish social service organizations.
273
A Boston native, Feldbaum moved to New Albany and then to Louisville in 1909. Her family was from Grodna, Russia. She married in Boston in 1908. She and her husband were Louisville grocery owners till 1924. She remembers Jewish life and geographical distribution; Jewish merchants; synagogues; cemetery; Herman Straus Department store; the Depression years; the Young Men's Hebrew Association and Blanche Mitchell; dances; building the Jewish Community Center; the "Snack Bar"; swim teams; beauty contests; center clubs; Jerry Abramson; AZA (Aleph Zadik Aleph) Conventions.
250
Joe Fineman was a native of Chester, West Virginia. In 1954-1956 he served in the Army at Ft. Knox, and he came to Louisville in 1957. He was attracted to Louisville by its active Jewish community. He describes his personal involvement in community, including the Jewish Community Center's "Couples Club" (1956-57). He remembers Joe Kaplan, Norbert Friedman, Arthur Kling, Sam Steinfeld, Aaron Schreiber, Jewish Community Center Clubs and centennial.
1037
The narrator discusses local Jewish organizations, individuals, and neighborhoods. Topics include the Jewish Hospital, the Byck family, Adath Israel congregation, the Young Men's Hebrew Association, recollections of World Wars I and II, the Standard Club, the Council of Jewish Women, anti Semitism, Jewish assimilation, and the Jewish Debutante's Ball.
251
Louisville native Hanna Fleck discusses her family coming to Louisville. Her father came from Kovna Guberniya to Baltimore to Portsmouth, Virginia, to Louisville. He first peddled in the country then opened a store at Shelby and Market Streets. Her mother was Rosa Berman. She remembers the 1937 flood, anti-Semitism, Mary Cohen, Bernard Berman, Levine, Lilly Meyers, Rabbi Gittleman, Lillian Goldberg Berman, Stella Levine, theater prices, Young Men's Hebrew Association, Girls High (1929), old Louisville landmarks.
223
Annette Gale's parents were Jenny and Aaron Vine, her grandmother was Blema Vine. They were all from Poland and immigrated to New York and then to Louisville in 1922. She tells of her youth and the Walnut to Magnolia and Brook Street areas. Her parents had a grocery store. Associated families: Eva Yussman, Herman Cohen, Freda Gurwitch, Minnie Cohen, Rose Tarbis. Discusses Jewish merchants, the American Grocery Co., the University of Louisville, Girls High School, transportation, Adath Jeshurun, Talmud Torah, going to Keat's Theatre at 5th and Walnut, radio, Young Men's Hebrew Association, World War II, and the 1937 flood.
1018
This interview is part of the Jewish Oral History project.
1027
The narrator discusses the Louisville Hebrew School and Adath Jeshurun congregation.
1197
The narrator discusses family history, local Jewish history, and present work with the Jewish Family and Vocational Service. Topics include the Louisville Hebrew School, the old Haymarket area of Louisville, family interest in Zionism, local Jewish leaders, and the orthodox Jewish community.
1177
The daughter and granddaughter of Vic Lorch discuss family history and the family business, Vic Lorch and Sons, which operated at various locations in Louisville, Kentucky.
1177
The daughter and granddaughter of Vic Lorch discuss family history and the family business, Vic Lorch and Sons, which operated at various locations in Louisville, Kentucky.
1011
The narrator discusses her family history; second-hand recollections of Jewish immigrants to Louisville during the 1840s; the Sabel, Selligman, Dembitz, Brandeis, and Flexner families; Jewish assimilation into the Christian community; Jewish neighborhoods; Louisville politics; Alfred Selligman; the League of Women Voters; Charles Morris; I.W. Bernheim; the Standard Club; relationships between German and east European Jews; Jewish businesses; and Jewish teachers.
1011
The narrator discusses her family history; second-hand recollections of Jewish immigrants to Louisville during the 1840s; the Sabel, Selligman, Dembitz, Brandeis, and Flexner families; Jewish assimilation into the Christian community; Jewish neighborhoods; Louisville politics; Alfred Selligman; the League of Women Voters; Charles Morris; I.W. Bernheim; the Standard Club; relationships between German and east European Jews; Jewish businesses; and Jewish teachers.
1011
The narrator discusses her family history; second-hand recollections of Jewish immigrants to Louisville during the 1840s; the Sabel, Selligman, Dembitz, Brandeis, and Flexner families; Jewish assimilation into the Christian community; Jewish neighborhoods; Louisville politics; Alfred Selligman; the League of Women Voters; Charles Morris; I.W. Bernheim; the Standard Club; relationships between German and east European Jews; Jewish businesses; and Jewish teachers.
1026
225
Sadye Grossman was 86 years of age at the time of this interview. She was a Louisville native. Her parents were born Russia, and lived at 9th and Market over their store. This was a Jewish neighborhood at the time. Discusses Adath Jeshurun, Young Men's Hebrew Association (YMHA), Ronetta Meyer, Wiles Groceries, prices, and recreation. Her husband, Maurice Grossman, served as general secretary of the YMHA for two years. She discusses the YMHA, and the war years.
1484
Jewish Community Center interviews
224
Hyman Gurwitch's father, David Lee Gurwitch, arrived in the USA in 1910. His mother followed with his sisters Mildred, Molly, then Freda and Bessie. David Lee Gurwitch bought a butcher shop on 7th Street. Associated families/people: Nathan Khan, Flumbaum, Baniss Cohen, Sol Waxman, Eichel, Lipetz, Goldsmith, O'koon, Streicher, Shaiken, Joseph Friedman, Rosen, Harry Goldberg, Block, Fehr, Rosenbaum, Eichenholtz, Morgan, Ethel Sher, Jerome Binder, Harry Cole, Willie Waits, Ike Gumer. Discusses Sidney Passamaneck/Leonard Stern and the Model Drugstore. Discusses Young Men's Hebrew Association, Adath Israel Sabbath School, Talmud Torah, Brook and Floyd (Simon's Grocery), 7th Street, Liberty and Jefferson. Graduate in pharmacy. Discusses YMHA Basketball, gold, handball, 1936 car prices, 1937 flood, 1974 tornado, and a tribute to Pauline (Sandler) Brill.
1021
Hammel discusses the genealogy of the Grabfelder, Sachs, Levi, and Bamburger families; the liquor business; Adath Israel congregation and the Jewish Ladies Benevolent Society; and the German-Jewish immigration of the 1840s.
1195
Mrs. Harris discusses her civic and religious interests, including the Mizrachi Women, the Jewish Day School, and other activities in the local Jewish community.
1183
The narrators discuss their parents, Rachel Franel Waldman and Abraham Jacob Waldman. The Waldmans and their four oldest children left Tuckin, Russia, and moved to Louisville, Kentucky, in 1904. Recollections include their businesses at 520 and 500 South Preston Street; the correlation between business and religious life; and the orthodox Jewish community.
1004
The narrator discusses growing up in a Jewish neighborhood on east Walnut Street. Her grandfather immigrated to the United States from Kiev, Russia. Her parents' family owned a fish market in Louisville. She discusses World War II and its effect on the local Jewish community, and work with various agencies, including those concerned with Jewish refugees from Nazi Germany.
226
Abe Hoffman was born 1906 in Rumania. In 1909, he, his mother and sisters joined his father in Louisville. His father worked in a clothing factory, and opened grocery with the help of his synagogue. Hoffman discusses education, his bar mitzvah, courtship, marriage, and his wife, Yetta Berman Hoffman. Yetta Hoffman was a native of Louisville, born in 1907. Her father was Harry Berman. She discusses school, her class at Girls High, entertainment, transportation, their grocery store, and the prices in 1929. Opened first Kosher meat market, 1945. Associated people and families: Brownstein family, Feitleson, Sol Weinberg, Gertie Fox, Libby Berman, Stanley Goldverg, Milton Berman.
1023
The narrator discusses the career of her grandfather, Jacob Greenberg, owner of the second Louisville Galt House, located at First and Main Streets. She also includes recollections of the hotel, circa 1914.
1044
Born in Louisville and a long-time associate of the Jewish Community Federation and its predecessor, the Louisville Conference of Jewish Organizations, Judah discusses a variety of Jewish families, organizations, and activities with which he has been involved. Topics include the Abraham, Judah, Klamber, Flexner, Popper, and Greenebaum families; Justice Louis D. Brandeis, Blanche Ottengeimer, Charles Morris, Louis Cohen, Lewis W. Cole, Sidney Handmaker, Stuart Handmaker, Rabbi Gittleman, Dr. Joseph Rauch, Minna D. Cole, and Ruth Morris; the Conference of Jewish Organizations and the Jewish Community Federation, various Jewish neighborhoods, changes in the Jewish Community Federation's activities, and the Federation's endowment fund.
1044
Born in Louisville and a long-time associate of the Jewish Community Federation and its predecessor, the Louisville Conference of Jewish Organizations, Judah discusses a variety of Jewish families, organizations, and activities with which he has been involved. Topics include the Abraham, Judah, Klamber, Flexner, Popper, and Greenebaum families; Justice Louis D. Brandeis, Blanche Ottengeimer, Charles Morris, Louis Cohen, Lewis W. Cole, Sidney Handmaker, Stuart Handmaker, Rabbi Gittleman, Dr. Joseph Rauch, Minna D. Cole, and Ruth Morris; the Conference of Jewish Organizations and the Jewish Community Federation, various Jewish neighborhoods, changes in the Jewish Community Federation's activities, and the Federation's endowment fund.
1048
Kaplan discusses his family, the Louisville Hebrew School, the Young Men's Hebrew Association, and the Jewish Community Center.
227
A Louisville native, Anne Karl was born in 1900. Her father, Jacob Simons, came to the Louisville in 1890. He was a shoemaker, but became peddler. His parents were from Kovno Guberniya. Discusses Preston and Floyd Streets (shoe store and school), the Jewish butcher on Jefferson Street, Morris School, Young Men's Hebrew Association at 1st Street, Floyd and Chestnut School (which became Adath Jeshurun), and the winter of 1917, which was bad. She also discusses the YMHA at 2nd and College Streets, and Bea and Minnie Isaacs, who were ardent Zionists. She talks about politics, the Jewish community, the Ladies Hebrew Society, Rabbi Zarchy, and Mrs. Morris Salzman.
1028
468
Ann Klein is a survivor of the Holocaust. She tells her story of this period of history and the experiences she had.
468
Ann Klein is a survivor of the Holocaust. She tells her story of this period of history and the experiences she had.
468
Ann Klein is a survivor of the Holocaust. She tells her story of this period of history and the experiences she had.
1097
Harry Jackson Klein discusses his father, a Latvian rabbi; his early education under his father; growing up around the corner of First and Walnut Street; high school education at Louisville Male; going to work at eighteen as a salesman; various business enterprises; World War II when he directed Louisville's Office of Price Administration; and wartime work in gas rationing and scrap metal drives. Klein concludes with recollections of his work in the Jewish community, including the building of Jewish Hospital and reflections on how the community has changed during this lifetime.
228
Klein's father was Frank Leon Klein; his parents came from Russia 1880s. His mother was Ida Natofsky Klein; she was a Louisville native. Her parents arrived in 1859 and joined Adath Jeshurun, then called Green Street School. Murrel was born in Jewish Hospital, Louisville, in 1905. His father's business necessitated several moves. He had his bar mitzvah in Louisville (Rabbi Zarchy). Discusses: 1910-1916 Taustine Deli; Jewish life of times; Dr. Leon L. Solomon (identified as first Jewish doctor). Klein went to Washington and Lee in 1921. He discusses the Young Men's Hebrew Association Baseball League, 1926-1931; Young Men's Hebrew Association Camp in 1919; Troop 30 Boy Scouts; Market Street Jews - most from Russia, most Orthodox. He discusses World War II, war bonds and World War II YMHA dances and brunches. He also discusses the 1937 flood. Associated names: Charles W. Morris, Frank Garlove, Harry Klein, Meyer Klein, Sol Natofsky, Oertmer, Rosenberg's Mose and Pearl Marks, Oscar Leibson, Joe Garfein, Poachy Marks, O'Mara White.
1043
Klein (born 1906) discusses his life and work in Louisville, Kentucky. Topics include growing up in the neighborhood of First and Green area, Klein's work in the used car business beginning in the 1920s, the Depression of the 1930s in Louisville, the ultimate success of Klein's car business (National Auto Sales), and his entrance into banking (Bank of Louisville). The interview also includes Klein's impression of the Jewish community in Louisville and local civic leaders generally.
1046
1031
Kling discusses his life beginning with growing up in Louisville, Kentucky, during the 1890s and 1900s, through his present work with local organizations concerned with the welfare of senior citizens. Important topics, episodes, and individuals mentioned include Kling's experiences at Male High School; his period of study for the rabbinate at Hebrew Union College in Cincinnati, Ohio, and eventual decision to abandon that pursuit; work with the National Jewish Welfare Board during World War I, especially at Camp Taylor near Louisville during the Spanish Influenza epidemic; his brief period of living in Chicago, Illinois, during the late 1910s; return to Louisville in 1919 and work with the Kling Stationery Company; his participation in the Socialist Party in Louisville and Kentucky during the 1930s. The interview also covers Kling's work with various Jewish, civic, and civil rights organizations in Louisville from the 1930s to the 1970s, his recollections of Charles Morris, and his views on the nature of Judaism.
229
A Louisville native, Kling's grandparents came from Germany to Aurora, Indiana, and then to Louisville where they started the Kling Stationary Co. His parents were Arthur and Selma Marcus Kling. He grew up in the east end. There were few Jewish merchants in the Highland. He discusses attending the Spencerian School, serving in the Army, and attending the Speed School at the University of Louisville. He was a member of the Hi-Fi Society, and Louisville Photographic Society and was a stamp collector. He was a Civil Air Patrol Instructor - at West Point 1965, learned to fly. His parents were very civically involved - Club 60, Selma with refugee settlement, Arthur with scouts, politics and senior citizens. Temple Shalom - deep involvement started in his kitchen. He also discusses Young Men's Hebrew Association, River Camp, Jewish Community. He also talks about the Flood of 1937.
230
Margot Kling's parents were Hilda and Adolph Preis. They were born in Frankfort, Germany; father decided early after Hitler came to power that it was time to leave. They travelled to the U.S. on the Queen Mary when she was 10, and settled in Louisville. She talks about working at Kentucky Dairies in the summer. She also discusses Helena Weiss, Adolph Weiss, Else and Gunther Eichhorn, Louis Mann and Mother, H.J. Wolff, and Hermine Wolff, Palmer Marcus, Laurence Koch, Ronetta Mayer, Sylvia Pardnes, Clara Wasserman Rowe, Annette Russman. She discusses meeting her husband at Camp Tall Trees, and college. She recalls the fundraising to build the Jewish Community Center, Temple Shalom, Hadassah (Betty Ades), Gita Comer, JSSA Board - 3 generations, deeply involved Temple Shalom.
1051
Two sisters discuss their childhood on Green (now Liberty) Street and in Stanford, Kentucky; their parents and grandparents who came to the United States from Russia; their grandfather, a soldier in the Russian Army during the Crimean War; and their recollections of the Jewish community in Louisville. Portions of the tapes are defective.
1176
Two sisters discuss their childhood on Green (now Liberty) Street and in Stanford, Kentucky; their parents and grandparents who came to the United States from Russia; their grandfather, a soldier in the Russian Army during the Crimean War; and their recollections of the Jewish community in Louisville. Note: portions of the tapes are defective.
1094
Mrs. Rebecca Krupp discusses her childhood spent on Madison Street (now Abraham Flexner Place) in a largely Jewish neighborhood; her education at George W. Morris elementary school, attended by many Jewish children in her neighborhood; undergraduate education at the University of Louisville and graduate training at the Kent School of Social Work of the University of Louisville; social work experience at Neighborhood House and with the state of Kentucky; and reflections on changes in social work, the nation of Israel, and current events in the Middle East.
231
Herman Landau was born in 1911. His parents were born in Galitzia. His father arrived in the USA in 1898 and his mother arrived 1900, from Austria-Hungary. His father was a teacher at a New York Hebrew school, and came because of countrymen here. Landau discusses his family, the world wars, the Courier-Journal in World War II, and Pearl Harbor. He discusses his 1946 marriage to Leah Seligman. Early memories include growing up at Jackson and Market; schooling at the Morris School, which was almost all Jewish. He describes the area of Madison Street between Brook and Preston as being a Jewish neighborhood. He discusses the Young Men's Hebrew Association; Jewish newspapers including the Spokesman, Chronicler, Kentucky Jewish Post, B'nai B'rith Brief, Center Bulletin, and the Community. He describes Louisville as a big clothing manufacturing center. There were two separate communities. German families were philanthropic; started Jewish Hospital in the 1920's. The Eastern European Jews and German Jews began to mix at the YMHA, and began to intermarry. In 1975 Landau married Helen Berman. He talks about the morale program in World War I, which led to the creation of the USO, and the involvement of Alvin Younger and Arthur Kling in this work; the beginning of the YMHA Orchestra in 1916, and Morris Simon's role; and newspaper publishing during 1937 flood. Associated persons: Ben Roth, Joseph Landau, Israel Landau - Sol Horn, Louie Levine, Teacher - Rabbinovitz, Sidney Friedman, Jack Goldstein, Zalzman's, Zeiden, Applebaum, Leibsons's.
1009
The son of Jewish immigrants from Austria-Hungary discusses childhood recollections of Louisville prior to 1922, when he left the city. Topics include the Jewish neighborhood east of downtown Louisville, the orthodox Jewish community, Jewish businesses, and Jewish families.
1009
The son of Jewish immigrants from Austria-Hungary discusses childhood recollections of Louisville prior to 1922, when he left the city. Topics include the Jewish neighborhood east of downtown Louisville, the orthodox Jewish community, Jewish businesses, and Jewish families.
1036
Miss Landau discusses various Louisville neighborhoods, her education and teaching career at the University of Louisville and other schools, the Dembitz and Brandeis families, the Young Men's Hebrew Association, and Adath Jeshurun congregation.
1020
Levitch discusses Anshei Sfard Synagogue, Adath Israel Temple, the Max Nathan Orphanage, the Young Men's Hebrew Association, the Brownstein Family, and various local organizations. Levitch is president of the Southern Liquor Company.
232
Delores Levy discusses her father, Edward Shaikun, who was from Trokai in Russia. (Trokai was a resort, about 30 miiles from Vilna.) Her mother's family, Alec and Esther Lerner, were from White Russia; her mother was Eugenia Sophie Lerner Shaikun. Her siblings: Dian, Lester Shaikun, Elizabeth Weinberg, Delores, Sandy Zelony, Arnold Shaikun. She discusses the Depression, moving back to Greenburg, with Adath Jeshurun, University of Kentucky, the Jewish Community Center, and family, Udel Barry and Sheila Suebold, Michael Gerald, Sue Daniels, Jacob Edward, and Ira Richard.
233
The Lexington, Kentucky native tells of his paternal family's flight from Vilna, Russia, to the United States. His father was Isador Levy (born Vershvovsky). His grandparents were Udel Levy and Esther Desnet Levy. His mother was Rebecca (Betty) Kravetz Levy. Her parents were Beryl and Rose Ades Kravetz. His religious affiliation was with Adath Jeshurun. Associated persons: Saul Ades, Lilly Mickler, Margolis, Edith Shirly and Albert Spivak, Debra and Manuel Slinger, (Uncle) Nat Levy, Ben Kaplan, William Culter, Roger Fox, V.V. Cook.
1485
Jewish Community interviews
234
Irving Lipetz was born in 1930. His parents, Morris and Jenny Lipetz, came to the United States from Grodna, Russia in 1904. They landed in New York and moved to Louisville in 1916. He discusses his siblings. One of his grandfathers was doctor, one was scribe, wrote Torahs. Describes the Preston Street "ghetto," where everyone was poor but they didn't know it. He describes the neighborhood including Synder the Butcher; Kommors's Dry Cleaning Plant; and Gershune's, which peddled Wiener-Wurst. African Americans and Italians shared the same street. He discusses Talmud Torah, prices back in the day, the River Road football team, and the Young Men's Hebrew Association. He met his first wife, Blance Ginsburg, at Center - YMHA Camp. He talks about community work - after University of Louisville, was social case worker, Social Security Administration 1941-1980.
1038
235
Louisville native Ray Eva Lipetz discusses her mother's great-grandfather Avram Finko (and wife Golde), who was a physician under Russian government. Her parents came to the United States in 1904 and 1905. Her father's father wrote Torahs. Born 1920, she lived on Preston and Walnut, which was the heart of the Jewish area in Louisville at the time. She discusses her schooling, Haymarket, 4th Street, and Thompson's Restaurant in particular. She talks about Summer's Park for summer picnics. Associated persons: Boris Pressma; Komors; Eli Jaffe; Leon Shvinsky; Charlie Weisberg; Goody Goldberg; Jerry Castleman - Sylvia, Ruth Kleinman; Kenneseth - Rabbi Mandelbaum/Rabbi Brilliant.
236
S. Arnold Lynch was born in 1915. His father, Jack, was born in Cincinnati in 1893. His mother was Lillian Morguelan Lynch. His paternal grandfather, David Lynch, was from a small town in the Ukraine, then Southern Russia, and fled to the United States from Russia. He had a butcher shop in St. Louis. In 1885 he sent for his childhood sweetheart, Sarah. On his mother's side, Rebecca Morguelan was from Kiev; her husband was Samuel. David and Sarah moved to Louisville in 1890. Lynch discusses Fruit Market, East Jefferson, a grocery at 18th and Gallagher. The family lived above the grocery. He was born at East Brook between Grey and Chestnut. He discusses civic work and his service with the Young Men's Hebrew Association. He also discusses Anshei Sfard, Adath Jeshurun (Brook and College), Preston and Fehr, and Kenneseth. He discusses bread lines during the Depression. He married Joan F. Greenstein, whose family owned "Bon Ton." His law partner was Grover G. Sales. He talks about his work as chair of the USO of the Jewish Welfare Board during WWII, Civil Rights in the 1950s, and the 1964 Civil Rights Act. He was chair of the Kentucky Civil Liberties Union in the 1960s.
1486
Jewish Community Center interviews
1487
Jewish Community interviews
237
A Louisville native born in 1914, Sarah Morguelan's family came first to Chicago. Her great aunt, Mrs. Binder, later opened a deli in Louisville. Relatives said to come to Louisville for work. Her mother was Celia Bass Goldberg. She discusses the 1937 flood, Young Men's Hebrew Association Reps. and Girls' Teams, Renee Hoffman, and her marriage to Jake Morguelan in August 1937. Taped with Rose Hummel.
1013
The narrator discusses the origins of the Brith Sholom congregation, her childhood on East Market Street, the Young Men's Hebrew Association, and the Louisville Hebrew School.
1180
The narrator discusses her parents, Stella Leon and Julius Shapinsky; the wholesale dry goods business which her father operated on Main Street in Louisville until 1921; early life at 11 West Burnett and in the Weissinger-Gaulbert Apartments; the building of the Brown Hotel; street cars in Louisville; childhood recollections of Louisville Central Park; childhood recollections of Louisville's Fourth Street business district; the Kentucky Home School, the Quorum Club, and the Standard Club; Louisville Marine Hospital (later called Louisville Memorial Hospital); the Council of Jewish Women and the resettlement of German Jews in Louisville; congregation Adath Israel; and the origins of Kentucky Jewish Post and Opinion.
1180
The narrator discusses her parents, Stella Leon and Julius Shapinsky; the wholesale dry goods business which her father operated on Main Street in Louisville until 1921; early life at 11 West Burnett and in the Weissinger-Gaulbert Apartments; the building of the Brown Hotel; street cars in Louisville; childhood recollections of Louisville Central Park; childhood recollections of Louisville's Fourth Street business district; the Kentucky Home School, the Quorum Club, and the Standard Club; Louisville Marine Hospital (later called Louisville Memorial Hospital); the Council of Jewish Women and the resettlement of German Jews in Louisville; congregation Adath Israel; and the origins of Kentucky Jewish Post and Opinion.
1488
Jewish Community interviews
1135
The narrator discusses his parents, who were Russian immigrants; his childhood in Louisville's Haymarket area; elementary education at George W. Morris and Thomas Jefferson schools; high school at Louisville Male; and professional education at the Louisville College of Pharmacy; involvement in the Young Men's Hebrew Association; a forty eight year pharmacy practice; and changes in the Jewish community during his life.
238
Sidney Passamaneck's parents were Julius and Lena Zimmerman Passamaneck. They were both from Covna, Guberniya. Passamaneck was born in Louisville in 1898 and owned the Model Drug Store. He remembers the Haymarket, and Block's Whiskey Store; his education; merchants, Jefferson and Market Street people. He remembers businesses and features including Jacobson's, Gordon's, Rosenbaum Hides; Kramer Meats; Rectannis Drug Store, Deli, Klein's Grocery, Jewish merchants; and mule-drawn cars. He recalls the Young Men's Hebrew Association near the Louisville School of Medicine as well as Friedman's Department Store and Mrs. Glazer's Restaurant. Other recollections are of the Casino Theater, "Thompson's," Child's Restaurant, Loew's and the Rialto. He discusses people including Hugo Taustine, Max Waldman, Dr. Brandeis Stern, Dr. Morris Flexner, Dr. David Cohn, Dr. Morris Weiss, and Dr. Solomon. He also discusses his marriage to Hannah Krebs in 1923.
1019
Mr. Paul recollects on the life of I.W. Bernheim, Louisville distiller and philanthropist. The interview includes information on Bernheim's religious views, his opinions about Jewish assimilation into American society, the Reform Church of American Israelites, I.W. Bernheim's personality, business, and philanthropic interests, especially the whiskey business in Louisville and Bernheim's endowment of Bernheim Forest. Bernheim manufactured the bourbon whiskey I.W. Harpe.
1014
The narrator discusses Jewish families, neighborhoods, and congregations in Louisville.
1014
The narrator discusses Jewish families, neighborhoods, and congregations in Louisville.
1040
239
Ringol's father was a doctor who graduated from the University of Louisville in 1908. He was the first resident at Jewish Hospital in 1909. Ringol's parents married in 1910. Her grandfather, Jacob Brownstein, arrived in the United States in 1884 and was a charter member of Anshei Sfard. Her mother's parents, Phillip and Bern Synder, were tailors from Odessa. Their parents were from Warsaw. They moved to the Highlands in 1931. She discusses Peerless Manufacturing Company, at 7th and Main; the family business in men's clothing; an uncle, Simon Agranot, who became Chief Justice of Israel and handed down Eichmann decision. She remembers living at Floyd and Walnut; YMHA basketball games; Adath Jeshurun Sisterhood; Fourth Street; Brown Hotel; Canary Cottage; living at 2nd and Hill Streets; front porch gatherings; the Depression. She married Louis Ringol in 1935. He was a dentist. She describes the 1937 flood; Pearl Harbor, World War II and the USO; Old Talmud Torah; Riva Waldman Entertainment; the Rarbis Family; the Ray Baer Family; Pearl Goodman; Lester Lipson; University of Louisville, and the Normal School for Teachers.
1489
Jewish Community Center interviews
240
Rosen was born in 1915 in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. His father, Zalman George Rosen, was born in Rumania. His mother, Anna Wesserman Rosen, was also born in Rumania, close to Bucharest. They married in the 1890's in Rumania. They moved from Rumania to England, and then to Canada to his mother's relatives. Mr. Rosen remembers life in Canadian Jewish neighborhood; Orthodox family; being drafted to Fort Knox, in World War II. He discusses the Young Men's Hebrew Association during war. In 1942, he married Louisville native Selma Rosen. Her grandparents came from Germany and Lithuania and married in Louisville. He discusses beginning joint Brotherhood Meetings.
240
Rosen was born in 1915 in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. His father, Zalman George Rosen, was born in Rumania. His mother, Anna Wesserman Rosen, was also born in Rumania, close to Bucharest. They married in the 1890's in Rumania. They moved from Rumania to England, and then to Canada to his mother's relatives. Mr. Rosen remembers life in Canadian Jewish neighborhood; Orthodox family; being drafted to Fort Knox, in World War II. He discusses the Young Men's Hebrew Association during war. In 1942, he married Louisville native Selma Rosen. Her grandparents came from Germany and Lithuania and married in Louisville. He discusses beginning joint Brotherhood Meetings.
241
Mr. Russman remembers growing up in an observant Jewish home. They lived on Chestnut Street, where personal poverty went unrecognized. He discusses early childhood friends. He recalls Jewish Bread Man; Rabbi Zarchy's funeral; being drafted in the second group at 18 years of age; World War II; active Zionists; the 1937 flood and a lack of Kosher meat.
243
Mrs. Sagerman remembers her father Jacob Simon who was born Latvia, who came to the United States to escape Czar's army. He ran secondhand store on Federal Street. Her mother was born and reared in St. Louis. Sagerman was born in 1924. She remembers her schooling; Orthodoxy and Adath Jeshurun; Goldstein's; Persky's; Fisher's Drug Store; Lerner's Restaurant (which was Kosher); movie prices (the Strand on Chestnut, Loew's and the Rialto (on 4th)); the 1937 flood; religious customs and rituals; picnics in Summers Park and Sennings Park; Charely Simon Deli; and Feitelson Deli. She discusses her marriage in 1953, and her husband's family. She discusses the Young Men's Hebrew Association, and Morris Simon starting the YMHA Orchestra.
1042
The narrator discusses work with the United Services Organizations (USO), the Jewish Welfare Board, the Young Men's Hebrew Association, and the Jewish Community Center; such individuals as Charles W. Morris, Morris Simon, and Louis Coleman; and the current program of the Jewish Community Center.
1041
244
Schwartz remembers bringing his family to Louisville from Cincinnati and settling down in 1941. He shares his memories as a man involved in business, civic affairs, B'nai B'rith, on 4th street, and with the 4th street Merchants Association.
1127
Mrs. Solzman discusses her parents, who were Polish; how she came to the United States from England in 1900; early life New York City; family business ventures and living in Montreal, Chicago, and Louisville; her first marriage and living in Harrodsburg,
1491
Jewish Community interviews
1140
Switow discusses his father, a Russian immigrant who owned movie theaters in Indiana, Kentucky, and West Virginia; his father's work in Louisville's Adath Jeshurun congregation; his childhood and education in Louisville at Cochran Elementary School, the Louisville Hebrew School, and Louisville Male High School; service in the United States Navy during World War I; engineering education at the University of Kentucky; Louisville during the 1937 flood; work with World War II bond drives; and views on the creation of Israel following the war. Switow concludes by discussing Jewish assimilation and changes in the local Jewish community.
1047
The Reverend Tachau discusses his family history. Most of the material concerns Louisville, Kentucky, and the Tachau, Levy, Brandeis, Wehle, and Dembitz families. The interview contains some second-hand information, but most of the material discussed falls within the memory of the Rev. Tachau.
1160
Tachau discusses his grandparents; his parents Charles Tachau and Jean Brandeis Tachau; his father's insurance business, E.S. Tachau and Sons; the Depression of the 1930s in Louisville; his father's relationship with United States Supreme Court Justice Louis D. Brandeis; and the efforts of Brandeis and Tachau to assemble a World War I history collection at the University of Louisville. Tachau also discusses his childhood, education at Oberlin College, civic and business interests, Red Cross Hospital, and the civil rights movement in Louisville.
245
Rose Jaffe Tarbis was born in 1919, in Jewish Hospital. Her father, Harry Jaffe, was an optometrist, and founder of Eliahu Academy. Her parents were married in 1913; her mother was Fanny Monfried. Her grandfather, Louis Monfried, was a Russian government bookkeeper who went to South Africa to make money to move the family. They came to the United States because a sister wrote of the wonders of U.S. They came from Riga, Warsaw, Kovna Guberniya. A cousin, Simon Sogoloff, was Solicitor General under Eisenhower. She remembers Frehling's; Florence Morgulan; Eli Jaffe; Dr. and Mrs. Brownstein; Rea Brownstein Benovitz; Goldsmith's; Naomi Scheider Roth; Baer family, Yoffe's; B'nai Yacov Synagogue; Young Men's Hebrew Association; "Meet-A-Body" Club; Ruthie Fay Linker; Birdie Nae Kaplin; Betty Ades, Founder Young Judean Organ. Father, Harry Jaffe, started Hadassah. She married Raymond Tarbis in 1938. Related to Ades, Grossman's, Baer, Berman's.
1039
1493
Jewish Community Center/Temple Adath Israel
246
Weisberg was born in 1942 to Charles and Marion Weisberg, who were both born in Louisville. His grandparents were Clara Hyman, Alec and Rebecca Bierman, Sam Weisberg and Mil. Earliest recollections are of Barret Avenue. He also recalls Resnick AZA (Aleph Zadik Aleph) - father, advisor; Young Men's Hebrew Association; schooling (at Fern Creek High there were only eight Jewish people); Hebrew School; Jewish Community Center, which was an integral part in life of his time.
1012
The narrator discusses the Anshei Sfard congregation, the Jewish neighborhood around Seventh Street, the Kosher Home, and Hadassah.
1175
Weiss discusses her family and life in Louisville, Kentucky, and Mobile, Alabama. Recollections include growing up in Mobile; marrying and moving to Louisville; Jewish refugees during the 1930s and Russian Jewish refugees during the 1970s; changing Jewish neighborhoods in Louisville; her husband's involvement in the Kentucky Heart Association; and the donation of his rare book collection to the Health Sciences Library at the University of Louisville.
1050
1494
Jewish Community interviews
1494
Jewish Community interviews
1008
The narrator discusses her original home in Herganeau, Alsace-Lorraine; her education at the College Les Jeunes Filles; World War I; her husband, a reservist in the French Army; flight through Spain and Portugal to the United States following the rise of Nazi Germany; impressions of America; and her refugee work in Louisville.
1153
Mrs. Leo Wolkow discusses her childhood in New York City; her parents, who were Polish immigrants; her husband's work with F. Wolkow and Sons; recollections of the Depression of the 1930s and World War II; the creation of Israel following the War; and changes in the Jewish community in Louisville.
1179
Yudofsky and his parents came to the United States from Lithuania, settling in Louisville in 1925. Yudofsky discusses the origins of his business, Yudofsky Furriers, Inc.; Mr. and Mrs. Yudofsky discuss their activities in the local orthodox Jewish community, including congregation Anshei Sfard; the Vaad Hakashruth organization; the Jewish Day School; and the Hebrew Home.