African Americans

= Audio Available Online
2360
Mr. Grigsby was born in Louisville and has lived here for most of his life. He moved out of town to go to different schools but otherwise has lived in Louisville, in different neighborhoods, and considers Parkland to be his home. He has worked as a computer consultant, astrophysicist, and astrologer. He was living in Parkland during the uprising/riot of 1968. Talked about his life and experiences in Parkland, how the geographic boundaries have changed over time, the issue of housing, political conflicts (white government vs. black government), etc. He has memories of the whole uprising as being exaggerated and blown out of context. Summary available
2361
Professor Grupper was born in New York City and lived there his whole childhood. He moved to Georgia and then Mississippi to participate in Civil Rights protests and organizations. He was jailed twice in Mississippi for his involvement and moved to Louisville in 1969 to work with the Bradens. He has lived in Louisville ever since and has held a couple of appointments in government: Human Relations Commission (1980-1986) and Metro Louisville Human Relation Commission (appointed by Mayor Fischer). He currently teaches at Bellarmine University and considers Louisville to be his home. Although he was not living in Louisville during the 1968 uprising he is well informed of the events and national climate of racial tensions during the time. He has a specific and firm view of Louisville as being a segregated city, then and now. He shares ideas for how the city can become more inclusive and integrated and briefly outlines the transformation of industry and business in the city. Interview index and summary available
2362
Interview index available
2363
African American former Louisville City Councilwoman Cheri Hamilton, born in 1950 in the Russell neighborhood of Louisville, Kentucky. Mother was an activist and role model for Hamilton’s activism. She discusses her experiences dealing with racism in Louisville while growing up, as a protester and later as a government official. She also notes the influence of her mother and her activities on her own activism. Interview index and summary available
2364
Interview index available
1184
Mr. Hammond, a small business owner and real estate agent, discusses his childhood, education and life as a young adult living and working in Louisville. He talks about being a small business owner, the impact of urban renewal on the black business district, Small Business Administration loans, and his belief in the potential of young people in his community. He describes the opportunities of black real estate agents, talks about busing, gives his views on affordable housing for low-income families and concludes the interview with a discussion of his desire for greater participation by African Americans in community development.
2502
This interview was conducted in 1979 as part of a series on African Americans in Louisville. It is cross-listed here as part of the Joe Hammond Series. Mr. Hammond, a small business owner and real estate agent, discusses his childhood, education and life as a young adult living and working in Louisville. He talks about being a small business owner, the impact of urban renewal on the black business district, Small Business Administration loans, and his belief in the potential of young people in his community. He describes the opportunities of black real estate agents, talks about busing, gives his views on affordable housing for low-income families and concludes the interview with a discussion of his desire for greater participation by African Americans in community development.
951
Mr. Harbin has lived in the Parkland area for over fifty years. He discusses his remembrances of early Parkland when they housed hogs and chickens. He also talks about his family and career.
923
Past librarians of the Western Branch of the Louisville Free Public Library discuss the black community and the history of the first branch library to open its doors to the black community in Louisville.
992
Hawkins, retired from the Louisville police force, recounts his work in the old Walnut Street area from 1939 until his retirement. He discusses the businesses and people in the area.