Art

= Audio Available Online
1137
Keller discusses his father's medical practice in Louisville's Portland neighborhood; his student days in the College of Arts and Sciences (B.A. 1930) and the School of Medicine of the University of Louisville (M.D. 1931); his internship at the Louisville City Hospital; Dr. John Walker Moore, Dean of the School of Medicine from 1929 1949; his residency in psychiatry at John Hopkins University and in New York City; and his career as a faculty member in the Department of Psychiatry of the University of Louisville.
1150
Ms. Kidd discusses her life, including her childhood growing up in Bourbon County. Kidd attended the Lincoln Institute in Simpsonville, Kentucky, and then began working for Mammoth Life Insurance Company, Louisville-based black-owned life insurance company. She discusses her career with Mammoth Life, which was interupted by service in the Red Cross during World War II. She discusses her experiences with the Red Cross, both during her training and during her service overseas. She discusses differences in white attitudes, in particular. She describes her work in pubilc relations and sales after the war, as well as her political career. She was elected to the Kentucky Assembly in 1967 and began serving in 1968. She discusses her attempts to pass legislation to give tax breaks to companies that would provide training to Kentucky residents, and her successful efforts to pass a low-cost housing bill.
1149
Koster (LL.B. 1931) discusses the College of Arts and Sciences and the School of Law of the University of Louisville during the 1920s and 1930s; athletics at the University during the same period (he won 16 varsity letters in football, basketball, baseball, and track); coach Tom King; President George Colvin; playing professional baseball in Akron, Ohio, Little Rock, Arkansas, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and St. Paul, Minnesota, during the 1930s; and the origins of his business, Koster Swope Buick automobile dealership in Louisville, Kentucky.
2544
Wes Cunningham interviews Louisville native Martina Nichols Kunnecke about her experience growing up and going to school in West Louisville. She discusses her time working for the Free Press of Louisville, her involvement with the Louisville Art Workshop, and her time as a member of the West Side Players. Kunnecke now works as an historian and is an advocate for the preservation and appreciation for the West End.
1333
American Art Therapy Association. Personal history and the growth of the American Art Therapy Association.
1337
American Art Therapy Association and Art Therapy. Pesonal history and the growth of the American Art Therapy Association.
1132
Dr. Love was a U of L professor and administrator, and sister of civil rights leader Whitney Young, Jr. Dr. Love discusses her parents, Laura and Whitney Young, Sr., their lives and involvement with Lincoln Institute in Simpsonville, Kentucky. Dr. Love and her brother were born in Lincoln Ridge, while her father was a teacher at Lincoln Institute, and she discusses the education they received there, and the atmosphere of safety and support that was fostered at Lincoln Institute. She describes her father's tenure as principal. She describes her experiences at Kentucky State, and also discusses her brother's emergence as a leader there. She recounts his subsequent service in the Army during World War II, where he discovered his ability to negotiate; specifically, he realized his ability to negotiate better conditions for his fellow black soldiers. She relates his educational experiences following his return to the States, and his involvement in a Harvard-based think tank. She discusses his involvement with the Urban League, and his relationships with those who chose different approaches to furthering the equal rights of African Americans. She describes the role of the Black Panthers and the riots, particularly in Detroit, in drawing some supporters to the Urban League. She also gives her perspective on the University of Louisville, which she came to in 1966 as a GE scholar. Dr. Love was quickly identified as a skilled negotiator, and she became involved in working with students, including the students who eventually took over the office of the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences in 1969. She offers criticism of the University of Louisville at that time (and in the 1970s) for failing to recruit and support black students and faculty. She does commend President Miller for his support of programs for students needing skill-building work. She gives her assessment of area public schools, and the possible reasons for their shortcomings. Dr. Love also headed the Lincoln Institute at the end of its days, from 1964 to 1966, and she discusses that experience. She recounts its closing, its brief life as a school for gifted and talent students, and its rebirth as the Whitney M. Young Job Corps Center. She discusses briefly the origins and role of the Lincoln Foundation.
2567
Dr. Hallman Martini discusses her work in the University Writing Center
432
Professor Moore (born 1898) discusses his childhood, education, family, and career at the University of Louisville. He came to the Department of Mathematics in 1929.
2569
Dr. Brice Nordquist discusses his work in the University Writing Center.