Civil rights movements

= Audio Available Online
982
The eldest son of the Reverend H. Wise Jones, who was the minister of the Green Street Baptist from 1912 until 1950, discusses the history of the church, the role that religion and the church played in his life and the lives of blacks in Louisville. He also discusses the role that the black Baptist church played in the 1950s and 1960s Civil Rights movement in Louisville and the United States.
1102
Born to Tal and Laura Moorman in Daviess County, Kentucky, Frank Moorman, Sr., came to Louisville in 1926 to rejoin his former employer, Dr. White, at his new drugstore in the Mammoth Building. Moorman later opened a drugstore with Dr. J.C. McDonald on the corner of Sixth and Walnut. He later opened a service station at Eighth and Walnut; this station became Frank's Super Service. Moorman discusses his grandparents and parents in the Buckhorn community in Daviess County, the evolution of his business, his feelings on the civil rights movement and race relations.
2395
Morrison discussed growing up in Old Louisville, attending segregated primary school, being the first black student in a Louisville Catholic School, and her activism at the University of Louisville.
975
Mr. Perry discusses his education, time in the Army during World War I, and his personal experiences as black principal in the Louisville school system. Included is a discussion about the quality of education received by blacks before and after desegregation, how black facilities compared with white facilities, and why few school employees were involved in Civil Rights movement in Louisville.
1126
Mrs. Ray discusses her early life and upbringing in Tennessee as well as her life in Louisville. Mrs. Ray moved to Louisville in 1934 and attended Louisville Municipal College (LMC). She discusses her education both at LMC and at the University of Louisville. She describes many "inconsistencies" as she calls them -- situations where African Americans were not treated the same as whites. She also discusses the civil rights movement, which she says she was not a direct part of.
1854
Civil Rights Movement in Louisville
1160
Tachau discusses his grandparents; his parents Charles Tachau and Jean Brandeis Tachau; his father's insurance business, E.S. Tachau and Sons; the Depression of the 1930s in Louisville; his father's relationship with United States Supreme Court Justice Louis D. Brandeis; and the efforts of Brandeis and Tachau to assemble a World War I history collection at the University of Louisville. Tachau also discusses his childhood, education at Oberlin College, civic and business interests, Red Cross Hospital, and the civil rights movement in Louisville.
1096
Henry Wallace was born to Augusta Graham French Wallace and Tom Wallace, a former editor of the Louisville Courier-Journal, in 1915. He attended the University of Louisville, but was graduated from the University of Kentucky in 1938 with an A.B. in history and political science. After college Wallace worked for the Lexington (Kentucky) Leader. He later worked for papers in Ohio and Puerto Rico. Wallace served in military intelligence early in World War II, but in 1943 he began a hitch in the merchant marine which lasted until the end of the war. In 1948 Wallace went to Cuba, where he worked for the Havana Daily Post and the Havana Herald, English language newspapers. While in Cuba Wallace also did freelance photographic work for Life magazine. He later worked for Time as a full-time reporter, covering Paris, Tangiers, and the Middle East. Wallace returned to Louisville in 1956 to manage his family's farm near Prospect. After the death of his parents, Wallace became active in civil rights, working for passage of public accommodations and open housing ordinances in Louisville.