Civil rights

= Audio Available Online
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Civil Rights movement in Louisville
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Mrs. Davis briefly described growing up in Louisville. The major part of the interview concerned her years at UofL. She described her relationship with other, primarily white, students, and with faculty. She discussed her two mentors, Charles Parrish and Harvey C. Webster at length. She told the story of how she and her friends picketed restaurants in the neighborhood surrounding the university and succeeded in getting them open to African Americans. She also discussed meeting with Dr. Philip Davidson, president of the university, and getting his support to accomplish other changes to equalize treatment for black students. At the end of the interview she briefly described her post-UofL career.
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Civil Rights movement in Louisville
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Civil Rights movement in Louisville
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Civil Rights movement in Louisville
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Civil Rights movement in Louisville
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Mr. Ealy, who came to Louisville in 1918, discusses his recollections of politics, journalism and race relations in the city from 1910s to 1970s. Specifically, this interview contains information on the African American journalists I. Willis Cole (Louisville Leader), William Warley (Louisville News), and Frank Stanley, Sr. (Louisville Defender); machine politics in the city; his recollections of life in the African American community in Louisville; and his philosophy of race relations. He also describes his early life and education.
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Civil Rights movement in Louisville
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Erlen was born in 1906 in Columbus, Ohio. He came to Louisville as Executive Director of the Jewish Social Services Agency in 1938. He recalls Jewish geographical and congregational divisions; Young Men's Hebrew Association; Secretary of YMHA, War year; then temporary Executive Director 1942-1944. He remembers desegregation of schools, parks, and neighborhoods. He recalls discrimination against Jews; the Civil Liberties Union; Civil Rights; Arthur Kling. He discusses resettlement of victims concentration camps; 1990s Russian resettlement; Polish resettlement in 1964; the family unit; nursing homes; Louisville Hebrew Home 1949; Jewish Family and Vocational Service and Dave Dobson; memories of early Jewish civil workers and volunteers.