Civil rights

= Audio Available Online
1715
Civil Rights movement in Louisville
1005
Irvin discusses her childhood in Hopkinsville, Kentucky; her primary and secondary education there; her move to Louisville in 1950, a city she found to be "friendly to blacks, but very segregated"; involvement in open housing demonstrations in Louisville's south end, led by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.; and work in Democratic politics as a precinct co -captain, captain, and committee woman.
919
Mrs. Jackson has been very active in the Louisville community especially with the African Methodist Episcopal Zion (AME Zion) Church in Louisville. She discusses her church activities, both local and national; her own lifetime, her family's role in desegregation and her family history.
1717
Civil Rights movement in Louisville
1718
Civil Rights movement in Louisville
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Mr. Johnson, a civil rights activist and educator focuses on Johnson�s involvement in the effort to integrate the University of Louisville and the University of Kentucky for blacks in Kentucky. Johnson contradicts the University of Louisville administrators by asserting that they did not voluntarily integrate as they have stated. He discusses the disparities between Louisville Municipal College and the University of Louisville. Johnson also discusses the efforts to integrate the Louisville parks system, the library system and the stores in downtown Louisville. Johnson describes his role in the defeat of Male High School principal William S. Milburn�s mayoral bid against William Cowger in 1961.
982
The eldest son of the Reverend H. Wise Jones, who was the minister of the Green Street Baptist from 1912 until 1950, discusses the history of the church, the role that religion and the church played in his life and the lives of blacks in Louisville. He also discusses the role that the black Baptist church played in the 1950s and 1960s Civil Rights movement in Louisville and the United States.
1719
Civil Rights movement in Louisville
1150
Ms. Kidd discusses her life, including her childhood growing up in Bourbon County. Kidd attended the Lincoln Institute in Simpsonville, Kentucky, and then began working for Mammoth Life Insurance Company, Louisville-based black-owned life insurance company. She discusses her career with Mammoth Life, which was interupted by service in the Red Cross during World War II. She discusses her experiences with the Red Cross, both during her training and during her service overseas. She discusses differences in white attitudes, in particular. She describes her work in pubilc relations and sales after the war, as well as her political career. She was elected to the Kentucky Assembly in 1967 and began serving in 1968. She discusses her attempts to pass legislation to give tax breaks to companies that would provide training to Kentucky residents, and her successful efforts to pass a low-cost housing bill.
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Civil Rights movement in Louisville