Civil rights

= Audio Available Online
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Civil Rights movement in Louisville
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Civil Rights movement in Louisville
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Civil Rights movement in Louisville
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Dr. Love was a U of L professor and administrator, and sister of civil rights leader Whitney Young, Jr. Dr. Love discusses her parents, Laura and Whitney Young, Sr., their lives and involvement with Lincoln Institute in Simpsonville, Kentucky. Dr. Love and her brother were born in Lincoln Ridge, while her father was a teacher at Lincoln Institute, and she discusses the education they received there, and the atmosphere of safety and support that was fostered at Lincoln Institute. She describes her father's tenure as principal. She describes her experiences at Kentucky State, and also discusses her brother's emergence as a leader there. She recounts his subsequent service in the Army during World War II, where he discovered his ability to negotiate; specifically, he realized his ability to negotiate better conditions for his fellow black soldiers. She relates his educational experiences following his return to the States, and his involvement in a Harvard-based think tank. She discusses his involvement with the Urban League, and his relationships with those who chose different approaches to furthering the equal rights of African Americans. She describes the role of the Black Panthers and the riots, particularly in Detroit, in drawing some supporters to the Urban League. She also gives her perspective on the University of Louisville, which she came to in 1966 as a GE scholar. Dr. Love was quickly identified as a skilled negotiator, and she became involved in working with students, including the students who eventually took over the office of the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences in 1969. She offers criticism of the University of Louisville at that time (and in the 1970s) for failing to recruit and support black students and faculty. She does commend President Miller for his support of programs for students needing skill-building work. She gives her assessment of area public schools, and the possible reasons for their shortcomings. Dr. Love also headed the Lincoln Institute at the end of its days, from 1964 to 1966, and she discusses that experience. She recounts its closing, its brief life as a school for gifted and talent students, and its rebirth as the Whitney M. Young Job Corps Center. She discusses briefly the origins and role of the Lincoln Foundation.
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S. Arnold Lynch was born in 1915. His father, Jack, was born in Cincinnati in 1893. His mother was Lillian Morguelan Lynch. His paternal grandfather, David Lynch, was from a small town in the Ukraine, then Southern Russia, and fled to the United States from Russia. He had a butcher shop in St. Louis. In 1885 he sent for his childhood sweetheart, Sarah. On his mother's side, Rebecca Morguelan was from Kiev; her husband was Samuel. David and Sarah moved to Louisville in 1890. Lynch discusses Fruit Market, East Jefferson, a grocery at 18th and Gallagher. The family lived above the grocery. He was born at East Brook between Grey and Chestnut. He discusses civic work and his service with the Young Men's Hebrew Association. He also discusses Anshei Sfard, Adath Jeshurun (Brook and College), Preston and Fehr, and Kenneseth. He discusses bread lines during the Depression. He married Joan F. Greenstein, whose family owned "Bon Ton." His law partner was Grover G. Sales. He talks about his work as chair of the USO of the Jewish Welfare Board during WWII, Civil Rights in the 1950s, and the 1964 Civil Rights Act. He was chair of the Kentucky Civil Liberties Union in the 1960s.
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Civil Rights movement in Louisville
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Civil Rights movement in Louisville
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Civil Rights movement in Louisville
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Civil Rights movement in Louisville
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Born to Tal and Laura Moorman in Daviess County, Kentucky, Frank Moorman, Sr., came to Louisville in 1926 to rejoin his former employer, Dr. White, at his new drugstore in the Mammoth Building. Moorman later opened a drugstore with Dr. J.C. McDonald on the corner of Sixth and Walnut. He later opened a service station at Eighth and Walnut; this station became Frank's Super Service. Moorman discusses his grandparents and parents in the Buckhorn community in Daviess County, the evolution of his business, his feelings on the civil rights movement and race relations.