Clergy

1002
Alston discusses his early life in Norfolk, Virginia and his primary and secondary education there; his college education at the North Carolina College for Negroes; his seminary training at Bishop Payne Divinity School; his ordination in the Episcopal Church; his ministry at Louisville's Church of Our Merciful Saviour, 11th and Walnut Street; work in race relations in Louisville; and general remarks on the role of the church in society.
1138
A retired bishop of the AME Zion Church, the Rev. Felix Anderson discusses his childhood in Wilmington, North Carolina, and Boston, Mass.; his childhood and college education at Livingston College, an AME Zion school in Wilmington, from which he graduated in 1920; seminary training at Hood Theological School and Western Theological Seminary in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; various pastorates and teaching experiences; coming to Louisville in 1948 as pastor of Broadway Temple AME Zion; entering local politics and his election to the Kentucky General Assembly, where he served from 1954 to 1960; and recollections of civil rights work in Alabama during the 1960s.
981
Reverend Bottoms recollects his early life; his education at Simmons University; the transition of Simmons University to Simmons Bible College and the relations of this to the origin of the Louisville Municipal College of the University of Louisville; and his work as pastor of Green Street Baptist Church.
980
The Reverend Hodge discusses his early family life in Texas, his experiences in Civilian Conservation Corps, college, a brief history of the Fifth Street Baptist Church in Louisville, the Civil Rights movement in Louisville and and his position on the Louisville Board of Realtors.
982
The eldest son of the Reverend H. Wise Jones, who was the minister of the Green Street Baptist from 1912 until 1950, discusses the history of the church, the role that religion and the church played in his life and the lives of blacks in Louisville. He also discusses the role that the black Baptist church played in the 1950s and 1960s Civil Rights movement in Louisville and the United States.
603
Lyon, a long time professor of brass and music theory at the University of Louisville School of Music, recalls changes within the school and at the University from the time he came in 1938 until his retirement in 1985. During the 1938-1958 years, he headed the University's bands, including the marching band. He has several interesting stories from that experience. He also discusses his role as part-time pastor of Louisville area Churches of Christ from 1943 on.
842
Dr. Parrish discusses his father, Charles H. Parrish, Sr., who was a Baptist minister and president of Simmons University, a black Baptist college in Louisville. Parrish also discusses his own life and work, including his time teaching at Simmons, at Louisville Municipal College (University of Louisville's college for African Americans under segregation), and finally at the University of Louisville after the Municipal College closed and UofL integrated. Dr. Parrish was the only member of Municipal's faculty who was offered an appointment at UofL following LMC's closure, becoming UofL's first African American faculty member. He describes this experience as well as his ongoing research interests.
931
The Reverend Sanderson is a 52-year-old black man, a long-time resident of the Parkland area. He discusses his life, the desegregated Armed Forces during World War II, and his struggles to achieve training as a mechanic after the war. He also discusses the Parkland area and the changes he has seen in the area over the years. He became a minister in the mid-1960s of Centennial Baptist Church of Louisville.
966
Reverend Schroerlucke discusses his ministry at the West Broadway United Methodist Church from 1966 until 1977. This interview focuses upon his adaptation of a church program to meet the needs of a neighborhood changing from racially mixed to predominantly black. He also discusses his role as a white minister to a black church.
965
Reverend Tachau discusses his work in race relations as a Juvenile Court judge during the 1950s in Louisville. During the 1960s, as an Episcopal priest, he took and active role in the open housing demonstrations.