Journalists

= Audio Available Online
1678
Mervin Aubespin (b. 1937 in Louisiana), a reporter for the Courier-Journal, talks about his path to the Civil Rights movement starting in Alabama and then in Louisville; Louisville during segregation; housing discrimination; and white flight. As an activist, Aubespin participated in marches, sit-ins, voter registration and organization for public accommodation, open housing, and to integrate Fontaine Ferry. Aubespin was originally hired by the Courier-Journal an artist, one of the first Black employees there. He covered the Parkland Uprising but did not get a byline or credit for his work. He then attended an intensive program at Columbia University to produce Black journalists and had a successful career as a reporter for the Courier-Journal, specializing in covering topics of interest to the Black community. Regarded as an expert on racism and the media, Aubespin is a past president of the National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ) and was given the Ida B. Wells Award for his efforts to bring minorities into the field of journalism. Aubespin was also the founder of the Louisville Association of Black Communicators.
1682
Civil Rights activist and journalist Anne Braden talks about her early years as an activist in Louisville from 1947 through the early 1950s. The focus is on the intersection of the labor movement and the Civil Rights movement, including integration within labor union. Topics include Braden's career as a reporter, the Farm Equipment Workers Union, the Progressive Party, and the beginnings of the movement for integrated hospitals in Louisville.
1683
Civil Rights activist and journalist Anne Braden talks about the Civil Rights Movement in Louisville in the 1950s and 1960s. Topics explored include eforts for school integration, the public reaction to it, her family's experiences with school integration, and redistricting of the city; the West End Community Council and its efforts to keep the West End neighborhood integrated, white flight, and the open housing movement; the activities of SCEF (Southern Conference Educational Fund); the emergence of youth movements; the beginnings of groups like CORE (Congress of Racial Equality), the Committee for Democratic Schools, and the Gandhi Corps; Black Power organizations in Louisville like JOMO (Junta of Militant Organizations) and the Black Panthers; the trial of the Black 6 and the protests surrounding it; and many individuals who were involved in the Civil Rights Movement.
337
Ms. Clowes joined the Courier-Journal in 1936 as a staff reporter. Her previous newspaper experience was with the old Herald-Post. She was named editor of the Courier-Journal editorial page in 1966, and held this position until her retirement.
436
Ms. Coady began her career with the Courier-Journal and Louisville Times as an assistant copy editor employed temporarily during the summer of 1945. She returned after graduation from college in July 1946 to permanent employment. She has worked as an assistant copy editor, feature writer, news reporter, education reporter, and general assignment reporter and in September 1981 became the Arts Editor.
471
Mr. Crowdus joined the staff of the Courier-Journal and Louisville Times in the summer of 1947. His initial assignment was to cover the police beat as a reporter. He then covered general assignment stories through the 1950s. In 1961 Mr. Crowdus began covering City Hall. Through the administrations of four mayors (Cowger to Sloane) Mr. Crowdus covered city government. In 1977 he returned to general assignment reporting.
972
Mr. Ealy, who came to Louisville in 1918, discusses his recollections of politics, journalism and race relations in the city from 1910s to 1970s. Specifically, this interview contains information on the African American journalists I. Willis Cole (Louisville Leader), William Warley (Louisville News), and Frank Stanley, Sr. (Louisville Defender); machine politics in the city; his recollections of life in the African American community in Louisville; and his philosophy of race relations. He also describes his early life and education.
345
Mr. Edwards began his career in journalism in Horse Cave, Kentucky as news correspondent for the four newspapers then published in Louisville. His first job in Louisville was with the Herald before it merged with the Post. After the stockmarket crash and a period with the Hearst chain, Mr. Edwards joined the Courier Journal and Louisville Times. He served as news editor and assistant managing editor of the Times under Norman Isaacs.
467
Mr. Frank Hartley joined the Courier-Journal and Louisville Times in 1938 as a sports writer for the Times. In 1956 Mr. Hartley moved to the newsroom. Eight years later he returned to the sports department as assistant sports editor. In 1968 he transferred to the Courier-Journal and assumed the position of assistant state editor. In 1976 Mr. Hartley became state editor. Mr. Hartley remained Kentucky editor until 1979, when he was named news ombudsman for the Courier-Journal and Louisville Times.
355
Mr. Hawpe has been with the Courier-Journal and Louisville Times since November of 1969. Prior to that he worked for two years as a reporter for the Associated Press in Lexington, Kentucky and for two years as an editorial writer on the St. Petersburg Times. Mr. Hawpe's initial position with the Courier was as the Eastern Kentucky reporter. In 1972 he joined the editorial staff. He served as assistant state editor for two years, until 1977, when he became the city editor for the Louisville Times. Beginning in 1979 he served as the managing editor of the Courier Journal.