Locomotive engineers

1248
Main topics: Early life, Nashville, school and marriage. Started in Transportation in 1963 in Louisville at $19.20 per day. Job severed with 282 award and became a switchman. Gained seniority and had more educational background. Influence of wife when racial barriers made position unpleasant. Became brakeman when switchman job was cut. Move to Glasgow where racial situation was bad. Gained experience as locomotive engineer on General Motors, General Electric and Alco locomotives. Around 1968 began to see other opportunities that could be open to him. 1971 became assistant train master, a position that proved to be valuable experience. 1977 became traveling engineer or road foreman. Then made immediate supervisor over locomotive engineers. Presently training of locomotive engineers is part of his responsibility. Utilization of the locomotives, new computerization for centralized train control. F7 Series, EMD, General Electric most sophisticated, centralized traffic control (CTC), service areas, modernization of equipment, unit train, road bed and increase in speed limits. Tracks and roadway the same location as in steam days. Necessary for rebuilding daily and the improvements on the locomotives themselves. Cotton outlines the boundaries of the Louisville Division. Terminals of the Louisville Division including the Monon Facilities. Discussion of the hump yard at Osborn Yard in Louisville. Cotton's responsibilities include thed following: training of personnel (apprentice engineers and supervisors), terminal breakdown and derailment procedure. This section also explains the regionalization of various areas of responsibility. Continuation of derailment sight procedure and notification if hazardous materials is being leaked and other general responsibilities. Strikes and the reason for training supervisors to operate the locomotives. Family Lines team approach, coming of women to the locomotive positions; some policy approach of the Family Lines that are important: Incentive program, scholarship awards for supervisors' children, scholarship opportunities for employees, higher level of education of training for new employees. Unionization and its effect on the company and present employee problems.
406
Mr. Howard was employed as a locomotive engineer for 39 years by the L&N Railroad. This interview deals with his experiences in the transportation field including the age of steam.
329
Clarence Monin was general chairman of the Engine Service Employees of L&N System & Affiliated Lines (Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers). Main topics: family background and education; apprentice locomotive engineer program; specific articles in the BLE agreements such as hours of service; explanation of the National Manning Agreement and the Reserve Engineer Agreement; present and future trends in the training of locomotive engineering personnel; effect of civil rights and equal opportunity legislation; BLE grievance procedure; legislative concerns of the BLE; changes in union membership, attitude and trends for the future; comments on the 1955 strike against L&N railroad; positive changes in the management of the L&N Railroad.