Mountaintop removal mining - Kentucky

2404
Jon Blickenstaff is a founder and organizer of Footprints for Peace, an organization dedicated to creating change through peaceful action. Footprints for Peace organizes events throughout the world that bring together in solidarity a moving community to deepen understanding of spiritual, cultural, and environmental issues. Their aim is to educate, inspire, and empower individuals and communities in building a sustainable future. Blickenstaff describes how Footprints conducts and plans their long-distance walks as well as discusses the “Walk for a Sustainable Future” in Kentucky. This peace pilgrimage begins in the coalfields region of East Kentucky and walks over 150 miles to the state capitol in Frankfort during the legislative session. Blickenstaff is primarily responsible for handling the overnight accommodations along the route and other logistics.
2402
Larry Bringing Good discusses his Cheyenne Arapaho upbringing in Oklahoma and his childhood, military, and work career in California. He describes meeting Jun-san Yasuda and Dennis Banks and his subsequent involvement in long-distance peace pilgrimages and sacred runs. Bringing Good discusses his reasons for and experiences with participating in Footprints For Peace’s “Walk for a Sustainable Future,” walking from the coalfields region of East Kentucky to the state capitol in Frankfort during the legislative session.
2403
Jean Chapman is a retired pediatrician living off the grid in North Carolina. She discusses her reasons for and experiences with participating in Footprints For Peace’s “Walk for a Sustainable Future” walking from the coalfields region of East Kentucky to the state capitol in Frankfort. The walk focuses on raising awareness on the effects of mountaintop removal coal mining on health, communities, and the economy in Kentucky.
2401
Russell Oliver is an Appalachian and has lived in Hazard, Kentucky his entire life. Oliver describes his firsthand experience of the impact of mountaintop removal coal mining on the health, economy and politics of his community. Oliver discusses his reasons for and experiences with participating in Footprints For Peace’s “Walk for a Sustainable Future.” walking from the coalfields region of East Kentucky to the state capitol in Frankfort during the legislative session.
2398
Jules Orkin is a Veteran for Peace and retired bookstore owner from New Jersey. Orkin describes his background and discusses his reasons for and experiences with participating in Footprints For Peace’s “Walk for a Sustainable Future.” Orkin, in his 70’s, walked from the coalfields region of East Kentucky to the state capitol in Frankfort, a distance of over 150 miles. The walk focused on raising awareness on the effects of mountaintop removal coal mining on health, communities, and the economy in Kentucky.
2399
Jim Toren is a founder and organizer of Footprints for Peace, an organization dedicated to creating change through peaceful action. Footprints for Peace organizes events throughout the world that bring together in solidarity a moving community to deepen understanding of spiritual, cultural, and environmental issues. Their aim is to educate, inspire, and empower individuals and communities in building a sustainable future. Toren describes how Footprints conducts and plans their long-distance walks as well as discusses the “Walk for a Sustainable Future” in Kentucky. This peace pilgrimage begins in the coalfields region of East Kentucky and walks over 150 miles to the state capitol in Frankfort during the legislative session. Toren is primarily responsible for organizing and transporting the walkers as well as representing the group to the public.
2400
Jun Yasuda is a Buddhist nun in the Nipponzan Myohoji order. Yasuda describes her upbringing in Japan and her introduction to Nipponzan Myohoji. A main practice of this order to chant the Daimoku Namu Myōhō Renge Kyō while beating a hand drum and walking throughout the world promoting peace and non-violence. Yasuda discusses reasons for and experiences with participating in Footprints For Peace’s “Walk for a Sustainable Future” walking from the coalfields region of East Kentucky to the state capitol in Frankfort.